// you’re reading...

Personal

Wishing for cake through fibre optic cables

Bell Canada - Frank and Gordon

I’ve received a letter from my Internet Service Provider, Sympatico Bell Canada, today. Frank and Gordon, Bell’s mascot beavers, have dressed up in scientist / engineer white lab coats and were welcoming me to “the next generation of consistent speed”. It has been two weeks since I demanded to have a fibre optics network installed, and apparently Bell has done just that.

As you may know, Bell has installed a state-of-the-art fibre optic network in your neighbourhood. And we are thrilled to announce that we have moved your current Internet service onto this powerful, new network, at no additional charge.

Score! Lets hear this again – Bell has installed a state-of-the-art fibre optic network in your neighbourhood. Sounds good, doesn’t it? The problem is that my download speed still caps out at the same 4000something kilobits per second, just as it did before this network was installed. Must be limited in the modem itself, after all, there’s still room to pay more for a faster plan.

Oh well, at least all this excess bandwidth should ensure more consistency, stability, etc. And I was given a shiny, plastic, “Speed of Light Internet License”.

Bearer entitled to travel at speed of light on the new fibre optic network.

That might be technically true, but there’s got to be some artificial delays somewhere to make my bandwidth average out to be the same as before. Darn.

Read more

Uhh... nothing else appears to be relevant enough.

Discussion

  1. Posted by Bashar | July 30, 2007, 7:42 am

    Man, you don’t like the bandwidth, give it to someone dying to have half of it.

    Reply to comment

  2. Posted by Bashar | July 30, 2007, 7:48 am

    I did tell you before about our numbers :P

    I paid $550 to install air-cable to my new home location instead of waiting for the government land lines. After that there is the monthly $59/month for 256 DSL Connection, which is not up everytime you want it.

    Reply to comment

  3. Posted by Tony | July 30, 2007, 9:46 am

    Heh, you did tell me about your ISP situation. Though to be fair I don’t really get any of this extra bandwidth, just the indirect benefit of a more stable connection.

    Reply to comment

  4. Posted by Bashar | July 30, 2007, 12:54 pm

    We have Fiber Optics being installed in new areas, but no ISP utilize it yet. I am not raising hopes on this.

    Reply to comment

  5. Posted by Bashar | July 31, 2007, 1:37 pm

    If you are interested, i just got this news for Fiber optics in

    Reply to comment

  6. Posted by SpearMonkey | August 1, 2007, 9:12 pm

    Isn’t fiber optics a standard is Japan? North America is pretty behind in terms of internet connections.

    Reply to comment

  7. Posted by Tony | August 7, 2007, 10:32 pm

    Yup, Japanese upload faster than I can download. And considering the asynchronous nature of internet connectivity, that says a lot.

    Reply to comment

  8. Posted by Billy | August 17, 2007, 10:04 pm

    So all you had to do was ask them to install fiber-optic in your neighbourhood and u got it for free? i want some free internet

    Reply to comment

  9. Posted by Tony | August 17, 2007, 11:04 pm

    I’m sure that the installation was actually purely coincidental – I’m sure that it takes more than 2 weeks to install fibre optics throughout the neighbourhood. And simply being on the network doesn’t really carry much of a benefit. Well, maybe some bragging rights.

    “Hey look, I’m on a fibre optic line!”

    Reply to comment

Post a comment

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>